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Thread: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

  1. #1

    Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Due to the increase in often similar threads about Pokémon-generating issues, I’ve compiled and organized every information dispersed through various topics in this guide.
    I hope it’ll be helpful.

    Updated to: PokéGen 3.0 Beta 27

    Index

    'Main' Tab
    a) PID
    Manually matching PID with Ability (the long way)
    Manually matching PID with Gender (the long way)
    Manually editing a PID to make a Pokémon Shiny (the long way)

    b) Nickname
    Escape sequence
    c) Nature
    d) Held Item
    e) Happiness
    f) Ability
    g) Game of Origin
    h) Shiny Leaf (and other Gen IV-exclusive data)


    'Met' Tab
    a) Make a Pokémon seem hatched from an egg
    b) Make a Pokémon seem transferred from Generation IV
    c) Make a Pokémon seem caught in-game
    d) Make a Pokémon seem obtained from the Dream World


    'Stats' Tab

    'Attacks' Tab

    'OT/Misc' Tab

    Exporting AR Codes


    --

    ‘Main’ Tab

    a) PID (thanks to kaphotics for the informations)

    In Generation V, the PID is related only to Gender, Shininess and Ability. There’s no correlation to IV and Nature.

    When editing a pre-existing Pokémon, or creating one from scratch, leave the PID field blank, or delete the pre-existing one only if you intend to change your Pokémon’s Ability (use common sense – don’t give your Pokémon an Ability he cannot have), or if you want to make him Shiny.

    Note that Zekrom, Reshiram, Castelia City Zorua, Illusion Forest Zoroark and Liberty Island Victini cannot be Shiny. Pokémon originated from Wonder Cards cannot be Shiny.

    At the end of the generation process, when you either save your modified *.sav file, or export a *.pkm file, PokéGen will automatically fill the PID field with one 10-characters number matching Ability, Gender and Shininess under the Gen V PID rules.

    This is the fastest way to obtain a proper PID, and I personally prefer it over the PID Finder (Tools -> PID Finder), which I’m using only to calculate the IV/Hidden Power combination (see ‘Stats’ Tab).

    If you’re not interested in hex-editing, or in how PID actually works, skip the next three parts of the guide, and see b) Nickname.

    Manually matching PID with Ability (the long way)

    For Dream World Abilities, see f) Ability.

    The PID hexadecimal format is:

    AAAXAAYY

    X – Determines Ability
    YY – Determines Gender
    A – Takes part in determining a Pokémon’s Shininess

    Take your Pokémon’s PID. It should be a string of ten numbers.
    Open the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter.
    Paste the PID in the ‘Decimal’ box; Copy/Paste in a text editor the string that has appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box.

    aaaXaayy

    You should have obtained a string of eight characters, matching the format described above. Now, copy only the fourth character in your string (the X in the format, which determines Ability), and paste it in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box.
    We’re converting it in binary code, so you’ll need the string that has appeared in the ‘Binary’ box. Copy/Paste it in a text editor.

    Now, whatever sequence of 0 and 1 you’ve obtained, you need just the very last number of the sequence.

    0 -> Your Pokémon’s Ability is Ability 1
    1 -> Your Pokémon’s Ability is Ability 2

    To know which Ability is Ability 1, and which is Ability 2, open your Pokémon’s corresponding Pokédex Page.

    The first ability listed is Ability 1, the second Ability listed is Ability 2.

    Now, in PokéGen, in the ‘Main’ Tab, check the Ability value.
    If the Ability listed there matches the one set in the PID ( i.e. PID Ability 1 [Water Absorb] = Ability 1 [Water Absorb]), the PID is correct, and you don’t need to edit anything.
    If the Ability listed there doesn’t match the one set in the PID (i.e. PID Ability 1 [Water Absorb] =/= Ability 2 [Cursed Body]), the PID is incorrect, and you need to change the PID.
    Here’s what you need to do.

    a) Take the binary sequence you’ve obtained earlier and pasted in the text editor;
    b – 1) If you need to give your Pokémon the Ability 1, change the very last number of the sequence to 0;
    b – 2) if you need to give your Pokémon the Ability 2, change the very last number of the sequence to 1;
    c) Copy the full new binary sequence, paste it in the ‘Binary’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter;
    d) Copy the single character that has appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box;
    e) Take the 8-characters hexadecimal sequence you’ve obtained earlier, by converting the PID;
    f) Replace the fourth character of the hexadecimal string (aaaXaayy) with the one you’ve copied at d) (Select the character -> Paste)
    g) Copy the full new hexadecimal sequence, paste it in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter;
    h) Copy the full 10-numbers sequence that has appeared in the ‘Decimal’ box;
    i) Paste it in the ‘PID’ box in the ‘Main’ Tab of PokéGen.

    PID and Ability are now matching.

    Manually matching PID with Gender (the long way)

    The PID hexadecimal format is:

    AAAXAAYY

    X – Determines Ability
    YY – Determines Gender
    A – Takes part in determining a Pokémon’s Shininess

    First of all, you should know about gender ratio.
    Gender ratio is the percentage possibility of a Pokémon being male or female. It’s an information stored in the PID (aaaxaaYY – the last two Y of the format).
    Since we’ll be working with hexadecimal values, our range won’t be 0 – 100, but 0 – 255.
    For example, if a Pokémon has a gender ratio of 50% Male 50% Female, our breakpoint (between values that’ll generate male Pokémon and values that’ll generate female ones) won’t be 50, but 128.
    Numbers before the breakpoint value generate Female Pokémon (i.e. 0-127); numbers after the breakpoint value generate Male Pokémon (i.e. 128-255).

    Here’s a little chart of gender ratios and their corresponding breakpoint.

    87.5% Male 12.5% Female – 32
    75% Male 25% Female – 64
    50% Male 50% Female – 128
    25% Male 75% Female – 192
    12.5% Male 87.5% Female – 224

    Take your Pokémon’s PID. It should be a string of ten numbers.
    Open the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter.
    Paste the PID in the ‘Decimal’ box; Copy/Paste in a text editor the string that has appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box.

    aaaxaaYY

    You should have obtained a string of eight characters, matching the format described above. Now, copy only the seventh and the eighth character in your string (the YY in the format, which determines Gender), and paste it in the ‘Decimal’ box.
    You should have obtained one number in the range from 0 to 255.
    Open your Pokémon’s corresponding Pokédex page, and find its gender ratio. Check it against the chart above, to find the corresponding breakpoint value.

    If your Pokémon is Male, and the decimal number you’ve obtained is after the breakpoint value, PID and Gender are matching (i.e. Male Pokémon, breakpoint value of 128, decimal value of 233 -> PID and Gender are matching)
    If your Pokémon is Female, and the decimal number you’ve obtained is before the breakpoint value, PID and Gender are matching (i.e. Female Pokémon, breakpoint value of 128, decimal value of 78 -> PID and Gender are matching).

    If PID and Gender aren’t matching, follow these steps:

    a – 1) If you want a Male Pokémon, type in the ‘Decimal’ value of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter, any number between the breakpoint value and 255;
    a – 2) If you want a Female Pokémon, type in the ‘Decimal’ value of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter, any number between 0 and the breakpoint value;
    b) Copy the 2-characters string that has appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box;
    c) Take the 8-characters hexadecimal sequence you’ve obtained earlier, by converting the PID;
    d) Replace the seventh and eighth character of the hexadecimal string (aaaxaaYY) with the one you’ve copied at b) (Select the character -> Paste)
    e) Copy the full new hexadecimal sequence, paste it in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter;
    f) Copy the full 10-numbers sequence that has appeared in the ‘Decimal’ box;
    g) Paste it in the ‘PID’ box in the ‘Main’ Tab of PokéGen.

    PID and Gender are now matching.

    Manually editing a PID to make a Pokémon Shiny (the long way)

    The PID hexadecimal format is:

    AAAXAAYY

    X – Determines Ability
    YY – Determines Gender
    A – Takes part in determining a Pokémon’s Shininess

    Zekrom, Reshiram, Castelia City Zorua, Illusion Forest Zoroark and Liberty Island Victini cannot be Shiny. Pokémon originated from Wonder Cards cannot be Shiny.

    The Shininess of a Pokémon is determined by a combination of three values:

    a) The Pokémon’s PID;
    b) The Original Trainer’s ID;
    c) The Original Trainer’s SID.

    By editing any of these three values, we can make a Pokémon Shiny; but, since we want to make him seem caught or hatched in-game by us, we won’t be editing any of the Trainer-related data, but just the PID.

    Open the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter. Paste the PID in the ‘Decimal’ box, and Copy/Paste in a text editor the text string that has appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box.
    Like I’ve said above, the PID’s hexadecimal form is a 8-characters string, whose structure is AAAXAAYY.

    To determine Shininess, the three values (PID, Trainer’s ID, SID) are passed through a XOR bitwise function, that takes four arguments. Yes, not three.
    They’re as following:

    a) The PID’s first half (AAAX);
    b) The PID’s second half (AAYY);
    c) The Trainer’s ID;
    d) The Trainer’s SID.

    If you don’t know what a XOR function is, don’t worry. I’m writing this assuming you don’t know anything about Boolean logic.

    We have now to split the PID in half: in the text editor, add a space between the first four and the last four characters of the hexadecimal value you’ve pasted there earlier. We will now treat these two halves (AAAX and AAYY) as two different strings of data.

    Take your Trainer’s ID, and paste it in the ‘Decimal’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter. Copy the 4-characters text string that has now appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box, and paste it in the text editor.

    Take your Trainer’s SID, and do the same thing: paste it in the ‘Decimal’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter. Copy the 4-characters text string that has now appeared in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box, and paste it in the text editor.

    You have now the four values I listed above:

    a) AAAX (the PID’s first half)
    b) AAYY (the PID’s second half)
    c) QQQQ (the Trainer’s ID)
    d) ZZZZ (the Trainer’s Secret ID)

    Where:

    A is the editable part of the PID;
    X determines the Pokémon’s Ability, and must not be touched;
    YY determines Gender;
    QQQQ and ZZZZ are Trainer-related data, and won’t be touched through this whole process (don’t worry about them).

    Now, copy the PID’s first half (AAAX), paste it in the ‘Hexadecimal’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter. Copy the value that has now appeared in the ‘Binary’ box, and paste it in the text editor.
    You’ve obtained a sequence of 0 and 1 of variable length.
    If its length is less than 16, add zeroes at the beginning of the sequence until it’s exactly 16 characters long.

    For example, I’ve obtained this string, 101011111110. It’s only 12 characters long.
    This is how it should be: 0000101011111110. I’ve added four zeroes at the beginning of the sequence, to make it exactly 16 characters long.

    Do the same thing with the PID’s second half, the Trainer’s ID and the Trainer’s SID. In the end, in the text editor you must have four binary sequences of 16 characters.
    Organize them in four rows, in order to have:

    a) on the first row, the PID’s first half converted in binary code;
    b) on the second row, the PID’s second half converted in binary code;
    c) on the third row, the Trainer’s ID converted in binary code;
    d) on the fourth row, the Trainer’s SID converted in binary code.

    There’s a correspondence between the binary sequences and the hexadecimal sequences you’ve used earlier. Four characters of a binary sequence do correspond to one character of the equivalent hexadecimal sequence. This is quite important for the first two rows of the chart you’ve just created, the ones related to PID.
    Their actual format is:

    AAAA AAAA AAAA XXXX (first row)
    AAAA AAAA YYYY YYYY (second row)
    QQQQ QQQQ QQQQ QQQQ (third row)
    ZZZZ ZZZZ ZZZZ ZZZZ (fourth row)

    You might want to add a space every four characters of the sequences, to better visualize their structure.
    The last four characters of the first row (XXXX) determine the Pokémon’s Ability, and we won’t be touching them. The last eight characters of the second row (YYYY YYYY) determine the Pokémon’s Gender.

    Now, onto the actual editing part. We won’t be reading the rows of the charts, but the columns (AAQZ, etc.). Press Enter, and go to a blank, new row under the fourth one.
    Read the first column of the chart. If the number of ones in the column is even (i.e 1100, 1010, 0101, etc.), write 0 in the fifth row you’ve just created. If the number of ones in the column is odd (i.e. 1000, 1110, 1011, etc.), write 1 in the fifth row.
    Repeat this process another 15 times, one for every column, until you’ve obtained a fifth binary string of 16 characters (this is how the XOR function works, for those interested). Now, copy that string, and paste it in the ‘Binary’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter. Check the ‘Decimal’ box: you’ve obtained a number in the range between 0 and 65535.

    If the result is a number > 8, the Pokémon is not Shiny. If it’s a number >= 8, the Pokémon is Shiny.
    Now we have to edit the first two rows of the chart, in order to make that number become a number between 0 and 8.

    This is how the fifth row should look like:

    1-> 0000000000000001
    2-> 0000000000000010
    3-> 0000000000000011
    4-> 0000000000000100
    5-> 0000000000000101
    6-> 0000000000000110
    7-> 0000000000000111
    8-> 0000000000001000

    This means that the first 13 columns must contain an even number of ones. This is how it’s done:

    a) Go to the first column.
    b) Check the third and fourth number of the column.
    c – 1) If the third and fourth number are two ones (11), set the first two numbers to 0. This is how your first column should be read: 0011;
    c – 2) If the third and fourth number are one 0 and one 1 (10 or 01), set the first two numbers to 10 or 01. This is how your first column should be read: 1010, 1001, 0110 or 0101 (it’s indifferent).
    d) Change the fifth number of the column accordingly – since we’ve now an even number of ones in the first four spots, in the fifth spot we must put a 0.

    Go to the second column and repeat this same process. Go on until you reach the 13th column.
    When you reach the 13th column, repeat the same process, but never edit the first value of the column (it’d affect your Pokémon’s Ability, and compromise its legality).
    Do not edit the 14th, 15th and 16th column.
    Now, check the fifth row of your chart. It should be exactly like one of the binary sequences I’ve listed above.

    In your text editor, delete everything but the first two rows of the chart. Join the two rows in one single row (without deleting any number). Copy this 32-characters row, and paste it in the ‘Binary’ box of the Decimal/Hexadecimal/Binary Converter. Copy the 10-characters number that has now appeared in the ‘Decimal’ box, and paste it in the ‘PID’ box in the ‘Main’ tab of PokéGen.

    Your Pokémon is now Shiny. The Shiny flag should automatically become checked.

    b) Nickname

    The change in Pokémon names between Generation IV and Generation V, is that now only the first letter of the name is capitalized.
    For example, you wouldn’t name a Pokémon ‘LILLIPUP’, but ‘Lillipup’.
    If you want to give your Generation V Pokémon an all-caps name, you must check the Nickname flag.

    Pokémon crossing over from Generation IV games (D/P/Pt/HG/SS) to Generation V games (via PokéTransfer or the Relocator), however, maintain their original names, without any Nickname flag. For example, a Gen IV Scizor is named ‘SCIZOR’, and has no Nickname flag. On the contrary, if you want to give your Gen IV Pokémon a name with only the first letter capitalized (i.e. ‘Scizor’ instead of ‘SCIZOR’), then you must check the Nickname flag.

    Escape sequence

    Since the escape sequence in nicknames doesn’t affect the overall legality of a Pokémon, I’m adding this part only for your interest.

    The number of characters allowed when nicknaming a Pokémon is 11. Most names won’t reach this limit; the game automatically fills this void by adding, after the Pokémon’s name, an escape sequence, which is not displayed in-game. If the name’s length is exactly 10 characters (i.e. Roggenrola), there won’t be any escape sequence.

    Here are the two elements found in the escape sequence’s structure:

    \FFFF – Found after the last letter of the Pokémon’s name, and at the end of the escape sequence.
    \0000 – Found between the two \FFFF.

    How do we determine the length and structure of an escape sequence? In general, we can say that a name’s length is equal to x. The number of empty character slots is 11 - x; from now on we will call this value E, from ‘empty’.
    The number of times that ‘\0000’ has to be repeated in the sequence is E - 2.

    If E = 1, we’ve no escape sequence, as I’ve said above.
    If E = 2, we will only have the two parts that start and end the sequence, with nothing between them -> \FFFF\FFFF (since 2 - 2 = 0, we have no ‘\0000’ at all)
    If E = 3, we will have the two parts that start and end the sequence, plus ‘\0000’ repeated one time (3 - 2 = 1) -> \FFFF\0000\FFFF
    If E = 4, we will have the two parts that start and end the sequence, plus ‘\0000’ repeated two times (4 - 2 = 2) -> \FFFF\0000\0000\FFFF

    And so on.

    c) Nature

    Nature isn’t related to PID. Change it however you want.

    d) Held Item

    Do not give the Pokémon any Key Item. The correct way to obtain an Event-only item, such as the Liberty Pass, is to inject the corresponding Wonder Card file in your *.sav file, by using Grovyle91’s Mystery Gift Editor.
    Also, your Pokémon cannot hold currently unreleased Event-only Berries. You may have obtained them in Gen IV games, but since there’s no way to transfer them over to Gen V games, there’s no way to obtain them until Nintendo gives them away with Event Pokémon.

    e) Happiness

    Any value between 0 and 255 is accepted.

    f) Ability

    For matching PID with Ability, and/or matching PID with Gender, see a) PID.

    As we’ve seen, Ability is related to PID. However, Dream World Abilities override the normal PID/Ability correlation.
    First of all, you must know that before March 30th, 2011, only Japanese DW Pokémon are obtainable: you wouldn’t be able to give an English/French/German/Italian/Korean Pokémon his DW Ability and make it seem legal.
    To know which ability your Pokémon can have, check its corresponding Pokédex page. For a list of all the available Pokémon in the Dream World, check this page. For a list of all the Event-only DW Pokémon distributed currently only in Japan, check this page.


    To give a Pokémon its DW Ability, just choose it from the drop-down menu. The only other thing you need to do is to go in the ‘OT/Misc’ Tab, go in the ‘Extra Bytes’ section, select the ‘0x42’ value from the drop-down menu (it should already be selected), and set it to ‘01’.
    By setting 0x42 to 01, you tell the game to override the Pokémon’s normal Ability with its DW Ability, as you’ve specified, thus making it legal.
    Remember to check here (for Pokémon normally found in the Dream World), or here (for Event-only Dream World Pokémon), to see which Pokémon can have their Dream World Ability, either by capture in the Entree Forest or by breeding.
    Only two Generation V Pokémon can be obtained with their Dream World Ability: Darmanitan and Musharna. To be legal, they must be obtained:
    a) Darmanitan, in Desert Resort at Lv. 35, or through breeding;
    b) Musharna, in the Dreamyard at Lv. 50, or through breeding.

    g) Game of Origin

    Gen IV PokéTransferred Pokémon maintain their Gen IV game of origin – do not set this value to B/W. Check if a Pokémon is version-exclusive to a game – you wouldn’t want to have a Pokémon seem caught in a game in which he cannot actually be found.

    h) Shiny Leaf (and other Gen IV-exclusive data)

    Through the PokéTransfer, every Shiny Leaf and Pokéthlon data is lost.

    ‘Met’ Tab

    The Cherish Ball is a Ball in which are caught only Event Pokémon distributed by Nintendo. The Item is not even available in-game, so no generated Pokémon should be caught in it.
    The standard Encounter type in Generation V is ‘Egg/Pal Park/Event/Honey Tree/Shaymin’. When generating a Pokémon, do not differentiate anymore between all the Gen IV Encounter types.
    The ‘Fateful Encounter’ flag must not be checked, unless you’re editing an Event Pokémon distributed by Nintendo.

    a) Make a Pokémon seem hatched from an egg

    Needed when giving the Pokémon Egg-only moves; also the fastest way to set up a Pokémon for Random Wi-Fi battles.

    ‘Matching Trainer Information’ flag not checked (unless you're generating an unhatched Egg)
    Location: ‘Day-Care Couple’
    Ball: Poké Ball
    Level: 1
    Encounter Type: ‘Egg/Pal Park/Event/Honey Tree/Shaymin’
    ‘As Egg’ flag checked, ‘Fateful Encounter’ flag not checked
    Location (Hatch Conditions box): whatever you want (use common sense), but it must be set.

    b) Make a Pokémon seem transferred from Generation IV

    Needed when you want the Pokémon to have moves he could learn only in Gen IV (i.e. a Blissey with Seismic Toss must seem PokéTransferred to be legal).

    There are two methods, in Pokémon B/W, to make Generation IV Pokémon cross over to Generation V games: the PokéTransfer and the Relocator.
    Since the Relocator is used only for specific Event Pokémon (WIN2011/INV2011/HIV2011 Raikou, Entei, Suicune and Celebi), I’ll only talk about the PokéTransfer here.

    ‘Matching Trainer Information’ flag not checked (it affects only unhatched Eggs)
    Location: ‘(PokéTransfer)’
    Locations between parentheses mean that, in-game, you won’t see the standard Encounter text, but one specific to the method of obtaining specified between the parentheses.
    Ball: whatever you want (use common sense)
    Level: whatever you want
    Encounter Type: ‘Egg/Pal Park/Event/Honey Tree/Shaymin’
    ‘Fateful Encounter’ and ‘As Egg’ flags not checked.

    c) Make a Pokémon seem caught in-game

    ‘Matching Trainer Information’ flag not checked (it affects only unhatched Eggs)
    Location: check the Pokémon’s corresponding Pokédex page, and set the Location accordingly (use common sense)
    Ball: whatever you want (use common sense)
    Level: must be checked against the Location (i.e. no Lv. 100 Patrat are caught in Route 1 - use common sense)
    Encounter Type: ‘Egg/Pal Park/Event/Honey Tree/Shaymin’
    ‘Fateful Encounter’ and ‘As Egg’ flags not checked.

    d) Make a Pokémon seem obtained from the Dream World

    First, check the Pokémon's availability here (for Pokémon normally found in the Dream World), or here (for Event-only Dream World Pokémon). Remember to set the date properly, If you're generating an Event-only Pokémon.

    ‘Matching Trainer Information’ flag not checked (it affects only unhatched Eggs)
    Location: Entree Forest
    Ball: Dream Ball (or whichever other Ball; Dream Balls are specific to Dream World Pokémon, I suggest using them, even though using another Ball won't affect the Pokémon's legality)
    Level: Staravia is found at Lv. 14; Seaking is found at Lv. 33; Poliwhirl is found at Lv. 25 (Japanese only). Every other Pokémon is found at Lv. 10. For levels of Event-only Dream World Pokémon, check here.
    Encounter Type: ‘Egg/Pal Park/Event/Honey Tree/Shaymin’
    ‘Fateful Encounter’ and ‘As Egg’ flags not checked.

    ‘Stats’ Tab

    IVs are not related to PID. They must be set in a range from 0 to 31.
    The EVs total must be 510 or less; they must be set in a range from 0 to 255.
    To make the Pokémon’s Hidden Power be of a certain power and Type, open the PID Finder (Tools -> PID Finder). Check the Hidden Power flag, set the Type and power, and (optionally) a priority list for the IVs (i.e. ‘HP 31 = 1’ means that the HP IV value of 31 has top priority, and won’t be edited if not necessary).
    Press ‘Search’. Do not press ‘OK’ (you’re not looking for a new PID, just for the IV values you need to set the Hidden Power’s power and Type – For PID editing, see ‘Main’ Tab -> a) PID), but copy the new IV values the software has found, and replace the ones you had in the ‘Stats’ tab.

    If you want random IVs or EVs, just press the ‘Randomize IV/EV’ buttons.

    ‘Attacks’ Tab

    Use common sense. A Pokémon cannot have moves not in his learnset, or know moves learnt at some level above the level he’s currently at. TM moves, given that they’re in his learnset, are always valid, whether you’ve that TM in the Bag or not.

    The move ‘Snarl’ is obtainable only through the Event-only TM 95, which is currently undistributed. The only non-bred Pokémon that can legitimately know Snarl are the various Snarl Zoroark, distributed at in-life events in pretty much every language version. They can pass their exclusive move through breeding.

    If you give a Pokémon an Egg move, be sure to make the Pokémon seem hatched from an egg, in the ‘Met’ Tab, if you haven’t already done so.
    If you give a Pokémon a move he could only learn in Gen IV, be sure to make the Pokémon seem PokéTransferred.

    ‘OT/Misc’ Tab

    To make a Pokémon seem like it’s been caught by you, you must make its Trainer’s ID, Secret ID and Gender match your own. If even one of these values doesn’t match, the Pokémon will seem traded from another Trainer.

    A Pokémon’s Shininess is determined by a combination of the PID and the Trainer’s two IDs. To make a Pokémon Shiny, you can either leave the PID field blank in the 'Main' tab, and check the 'Shiny' flag (PokéGen will automatically generate a Shiny PID when saving the *.sav or exporting a *.pkm file), or hit the ‘Generate Shiny ID’ button (but the Pokémon will seem traded).

    Exporting AR Codes

    a) Left Click on the Pokémon(s) in either your Party or Box;
    b) Open the Code Generator (Tools -> Code Generator);
    c) Select the ‘Game’ and the ‘Language’ value according to the game version and language of your cartridge;
    d) Select the Activation Button(s) you want;
    e) Generate codes for: Selected Pokémon
    e) Generate and Copy, or Export to a *.xml file.

    Every Generation V AR code issues reported on these forums have been confirmed to be hardware related; if the code doesn’t work for you, you either have done something wrong at point c), or your hardware cannot handle the code’s length.
    Last edited by Acanto; Sep 13th, 2011 at 11:12 AM.

  2. #2

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Thanks, seems very complex to me but also very useful. This should hopefully help me for transferring my Gen IV Pokemon to Gen V.

    Edit: One quick question, if I'm making a Pokemon appear transferred through the Lab what do I set "Origin" to in the main tab? Should it be Black/White or left as D/P/Pt?

  3. #3

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveBob View Post
    Thanks, seems very complex to me but also very useful. This should hopefully help me for transferring my Gen IV Pokemon to Gen V.

    Edit: One quick question, if I'm making a Pokemon appear transferred through the Lab what do I set "Origin" to in the main tab? Should it be Black/White or left as D/P/Pt?

    It should be D/P/Pt/HG/SS, depending on the game of origin.

  4. #4

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    I just wanted to double check, I see the correlation of gender %'s and breakpoints is multiples of 32 with the higher % of males the higher the breakpoint meaning that a 87.5% male 12.5% female would yield a breakpoint of 32?

    -Also the following site is a live updating converter.. http://www.mathsisfun.com/binary-dec...converter.html
    Last edited by Krumweede; Mar 14th, 2011 at 10:16 AM.

  5. #5

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Awesome, thanks a lot. Can't believe I didn't think of the PokeTransfer Lab thing tbh. It makes so much more sense since that's technically where you're meeting the Pokemon for the first time in Black/White.

  6. #6

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    aaaxaaYY

    You should have obtained a string of eight characters, matching the format described above. Now, copy only the seventh and the eighth character in your string (the YY in the format, which determines Gender), and paste it in the ‘Decimal’ box.
    During my generating I put the value here and I got letters.. Isn't this value part of the Hexadecimal?

  7. #7

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Krumweede:
    hexadecimal values consist of both numbers (1-9) and letters (A-F).
    The corresponding breakpoint value for 87.5% Male 12.5% Female is indeed 32. I'll add it to the chart.

  8. #8

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Sorry, if I missed this but, in the nickname bar, does "\FFFF\0000\0000\FFFF" mean anything? Thanks for this guide! It has been really useful.

    Edit: Also, how do you make it look like it's been traded between white and black (what to put in the 'met' tab etc.)? Thanks again.

  9. #9

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    So if I want to make a Zekrom which appears in Black as "Zekrom" and not ZEKROM all I have to do is check the nickname flag?
    Oh jeebus, I've been going crazy trying to figure out what I was doing wrong... -_-

  10. #10

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    brucelee:
    Right! I forgot to write about it. Thanks for noticing. It's an escape sequence set by the game, that doesn't affect a Pokémon's legality. I''ve added the details to the guide.
    To make your Pokémon look traded, don't edit anything in the 'Met' tab, just change the Trainer's ID/SID/Gender in the 'OT/Misc' tab.

    X-Vision:
    To name your Pokémon 'Zekrom', you must not check the Nickname flag. It's not a Gen IV Pokémon.
    Based on what you've said, I think the problem of your Pokémon is the game of origin -- Zekrom is Pokémon White-exclusive, unobtainable in Black.

  11. #11
    ~The Gold Standard~ VetX's Avatar
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    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Speaking of Hexidecimals, does that mean you know them for BW? I've been unable to get my game to start when I have the PokeGen generated code activated on my AR, I just get a blank white screen. So if I had the hex values for everything that is checked by wifi's legality checker, then I could input that crap into PokeSav (though I'd much rather use PokeGen but it just isn't working out atm). If you had those values would you be willing to PM them to me?

    Another question: What's the deal with generating PIDs for pokemon that only get 1 ability and the PID will say Ability 2? Also, thank you for making this list of everything that is checked for by wifi; it's really handy and it confirms that I made all of my pokegen pokes properly, and that there's something else going on that's causing it to not work.
    Pokemon White FC: 3825-7811-6211


  12. #12

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    how do you find your secret ID?

  13. #13
    ~The Gold Standard~ VetX's Avatar
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    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    Quote Originally Posted by neveragain View Post
    how do you find your secret ID?
    This isn't the proper thread for that question. There are plenty of threads which pertain to SIDs and methods of obtaining them. The easoest way is to upload your game save via flashcart, to your computer and then viewing your SID from there. There are also Action Replay codes out there which supposedly show you, but few to none of them work properly.
    Pokemon White FC: 3825-7811-6211


  14. #14
    The Pikachu Master pikazapper's Avatar
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    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    This is very useful info. Thanks a lot.

  15. #15

    Re: Guide: How to generate Gen V Pokémon in PokéGen

    This guide is very useful. But I'm wondering if there's actually going to be an update or if anyone knows if there's a planned update for any of the Pokegen makes that will just make pokemon that are legal on Random Wifi?

    I am down with jumping through all these hoops if this is going to be the only way to do it. But if there's going to be an update in the near future I think I can wait.

    I can make pokemon just fine. Like the moves and stuff seem right and the stats seem ok. My only issue so far is not being able to get in on Random Battles on Wifi.

    Is this the only issue for everyone else?

    Also, is there a way to double check stats that anyone knows of?

    I'm doubting some of the stats generated because I can't imagine a pokemon like Victini with a 100 base to all stats at level 100 being around "average" stats when compared to my other pokemon. I am mainly having issues coming up with good IVs because I can't seem to find a "characteristics" list for Gen V pokemon.

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